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The last one - Steyr LG110 Hunting

Discussion in 'Gun Gallery' started by cloverleaf, Feb 4, 2018.

  1. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    The Resolution

    For quite some time I've been of the mind that I'd never buy another new air rifle.

    I'd reached this point for many reasons; numerous poor experiences of falling product quality, a lack of product innovation and progression, an increasingly poisonous domestic industry... while on a more positive note I'm in the lucky position of owning a few nice guns already so arguably don't need any more :)


    The Excuse

    Of course there was always the temptation to go out on the purchase of something that was a cut above the the usual offerings; something that offered real universal technical superiority rather than re-hashed old tech and marketing gimmicks.

    Surprise, surprise nothing domestically-produced fitted the bill. Plenty of offerings from the large European players (Anschutz, FWB, Steyr, Walther) did - although they were usually far too competition-oriented as all I want is a sporter-format-package.

    A while ago my interest in the Steyr LG110 was piqued.. I've always respected these guns for their technical merits, however have never liked them enough to justify dropping the asking price on one. IMO historically the Steyr LG100 / 110 series has been let down by squiffy ergonomics, uninspiring aesthetics, some pretty shifty woodwork and RH-only actions.

    However, improvements have been made over the years. Quick-fill cylinders are now the norm and there's an aesthetically-palatable sporting model now that the Hunter has been fitted with a decent fullish Walnut butt-stock with adjustable cheek-piece rather than the plastic / wood hybrid found on earlier models.

    Many parts of the action are now finished in black (chassis, air cylinder and bolt) for a more low-key aesthetic and I think the current Hunter now seems like a tasteful exercise in modern minimalism and understatement.. apart perhaps from the enormous "Steyr" script carved into both sides of the chassis :rolleyes:

    A while ago the facility was also introduced to allow the cocking lever to be positioned on the LHS of the action too, meaning I could actually buy a gun that fitted me properly.


    The Quest

    I'd started looking at used LG110 Hunters but there weren't that many about, few with the nicer, more modern stock and none in LH configuration. In addition those in the know seemed non-plussed by the process of swapping the cocking lever orientation, so I investigated other options.

    Unfortunately for me Steyr had recently replaced the LG110 rifles with the Challenge range and the new Challenge Hunting. Obviously aesthetics are subjective, however this model had me reaching for the eye-bleach.

    By all accounts the new model is much like the old one internally, differing really only in the chassis design. Sadly IMO the new chassis only serves to look nasty, limit scope mounting height and add un-necessary mass.


    Salvation

    All was not lost though! Talking to Steyr UK it was discovered that there were a few remaining LG110 chassis' in the country. After lots of questions it transpired that these were (IIRC) the "2014 Connect" spec, which have a longer front portion that projects past the "sharks fin" barrel support.

    This wasn't the 2011 spec Hunter chassis I was after, so Simon at Steyr UK had a word with Steyr in Austria; who apparently still had two Hunter-spec LG110 chassis in stock :cool:

    Needless to say one was ordered and I was told that there would be a 6ish week wait while the rifle was built.

    In an industry where dealing with suppliers is frequently as pleasant as having teeth pulled, I can't praise the service at Steyr UK enough. Throughout the process Helen and Simon took the time to answer my many questions and jump through numerous hoops to satisfy my sometimes less-than-straightforward requests.

    Their knowledge and service were consistently top-drawer - their enthusiasm and willingness to help giving the impression that nothing was too much trouble. This is what customer service should look like - cheers guys :D


    The Story So Far

    What may have been the last new LG110 Hunting to leave the Steyr factory arrived within the stated time frame (again, often a novelty in this industry) and was in my hands earlier in the week.

    After arrival it was checked over, a 4-12x40 Panorama gingerly attached on some low mounts and some adjustments made to the trigger and stock.

    Anyway, some pics:

    full.jpg


    The choice was a toss-up between the straight Hunting with no palm rest and a 550mm barrel, or the HFT Hunting with a palm rest and shorter 450mm barrel. I wanted the extra barrel length for both internal ballistics and balance, while I didn't much like the look of the palm rest.. so it was an easy choice.

    Fitting a QF cylinder to the shorter-barrelled version means it projects past the end of the barrel which will make fitting a mod a ballache, although I do quite like the aesthetic in conjunction with the later Challenge chassis.. it certainly looks much better than the Challenge Hunter anyway, IMO.

    Personally I think the Hunting is the best looking LG110 variant and much prefer the more open shape of this chassis to the enclosed effort of the gun's successor. Predictably others disagree :p

    full.jpg


    Thanks to the addition of a slot on the LHS of the action for the cocking lever the gun is now available in left-handed format. While perfectly functional, I suspect the BZP pozi-drive screws that retain the cocking lever handle will be replaced with some self-coloured socket caps soon enough..

    full.jpg


    The lever operates on an over-centre cam principal; causing it to snap into and out of the closed position when operated. This required a bit more force than I liked when it arrived, so the barrel was adjusted to reduce the load. On these later guns this is achieved by jacking the barrel backward and forward using the two retaining grub screws in the chassis near the breech to get the correct position.

    Much like that on the Hunting 5 the barrel's OD has two shallow, conical location holes along its length at the breech. The pitch of these is maybe 1mm less than that of the retaining screw holes in the chassis; meaning that winding in the front conical retaining screw (with the rear one slacked off) pulls the barrel forward, while the rear screw pulls it back.

    This makes barrel adjustment a lot easier than simply applying variable amounts of axial load to the barrel while tightening the grub screws up, although it does remove the ability to "index" the barrel.

    Locking / unlocking force is now a lot more reasonable and once unlocked lever operation requires minimal force, as does the act of cocking the striker through its short stroke at the end of the lever's travel. General operation is slightly rough, but I'm hoping this will disappear with use or perhaps a bit of careful cleaning and polishing.

    full.jpg


    I'm no fan of the less-than-subtle branding on the chassis - on aesthetic grounds as well as the fact that it contains a few sharp corners that occasionally make themselves felt during handling.

    Finish on the metalwork is generally very good with a light longitudinally-brushed surface on the black anodised chassis - personally I'd have preferred a fine media-blasted finish but that's obviously just a matter of personal taste.

    Unfortunately there are a few light machining marks around the breech area but no show-stoppers. The apparently stainless barrel sports a matt-grey finish (perhaps cerakote or similar?) and appears to have a fantastic internal finish.

    The chassis has an integral standard-size accessory rail running its entire length, which while undeniably practical and versatile, also makes standing shots without a palm rest somewhat uncomfortable. It's also nowhere near as warm and inviting as wood on a cold day!

    full.jpg


    All UK-supplied Steyr rifles now come with a QF cylinder, which is a necessity IMO. The gauge seems accurate enough and its aesthetic is nice.

    The fill probe setup works well, however I've found that the standard green double-hard b*stard (HNBR?) O-rings Steyr fit everywhere can make probe insertion somewhat difficult; so I've replaced mine with much softer 70 shore Nitrile alternatives. This makes the process much nicer and should last well enough if treated with care.

    The longer barrel should make moderator fitment relatively straightforward, although I think some custom work will be required to get something that looks nice and fits without damaging the surface of the barrel. Sadly Steyr's mod adaptors are pretty crude, can mark the barrel badly and really let the side down IMO - so we won't be fitting one of those!

    full.jpg
     
    critter, Tubbs, ibo7 and 16 others like this.
  2. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    (continued)

    On low mounts the 40mm AO Panorama sits below the upper edge of the chassis, so mounting this low wouldn't be possible on the new Challenger chassis.

    While always a fan of getting the scope as low as possible I do find the head & neck position a bit cramped so might investigate higher mounting options. I like the idea of the separate Weaver rail (less likely to damage the dovetails on the action than mounts) however it really sticks everything right up in the air!

    I like the action's uncluttered, functional lines and bold curve at the pistol grip / chassis interface :)

    full.jpg


    The geometry of the pistol grip is a little different to that illustrated on other LG110 Hunting rifles I've seen - perhaps this is a change that came in with the introduction of the Challenge.

    There are fewer finger grooves at the front of the pistol grip and unfortunately for my small paws, the whole grip design is pretty large. As a result the palm swell isn't in the ideal place and the relief at the wrist is a bit much, leaving the bottom of the hand feeling somewhat un-supported.

    It's not a deal-killer but a shame all the same.. I've not got freakishly small [Politics are banned - read the Forum Rules]-hands so I think a smaller grip would have been more accommodating to a wider range of users.

    full.jpg


    The stock offers both a multi-adjustable cheekpiece and height-adjustable butt pad. While everything feels a bit large around the pistol grip, length of pull is fine and the butt pad offers plenty of adjustment range.

    full.jpg


    I think I've been lucky with the woodwork - the furniture showing plenty of dense, well defined grain and some striping. When / if I can be arsed to apply a decent amount of finish I think it'll look very nice :)

    full.jpg


    The cheekpiece has plenty of height adjustment and there's an amount of roll adjustment available too. It's comfortable enough although Steyr seem huge fans of fairly sharp edges in this area for some reason (the FT model's cheekpiece is like resting your face on the edge of a chair leg). On the up-side it does provide some level of repeatabilty as the cheek-bone goes back in the same place relative to the edge every time.

    As great as their products generally are, IMO ergonomics have never been a strong point for Steyr (or indeed many of the European manufacturers). IMO the shape and fit of the 50% cheaper Air Arms HFT500 or S510 Ultimate Sporter are far better; offering a more comfortable and accommodating interface with plenty more adjustment. Not to say that the LG's stock is terrible; it could just be a lot better IMO.

    full.jpg


    One big benefit of buying any Steyr rifle is that they're completely devoid of any anti-tamper sh*te that might hamper your ability to work on the rifle or ensure it remains within the legal muzzle energy limit.

    One small down-side to this is that to placate the frothing mouths of the AMTA, Steyr UK fit a reduced diameter (2.2mm ID) blue (or green) transfer port insert in an effort to prevent adjustment by the hard of thinking pushing the rifle over the legal limit. The down-side to this is the regs aren't set up to accommodate this; making the rifles inefficient, loud and air-hungry.

    While Steyr UK won't supply the proper black 4mm ID port inserts they can be had from various companies outside the UK for not a lot of money - I was lucky enough to pick up an unused second-hand item for £18 :)

    This will allow me to set the rifle up as intended for far better efficiency and firing manners. The rifle has an external velocity adjustor which is great for practicality during setup but also for potentially dropping you in the sh*te if you happen to offend an over-zealous copper.

    Once the gun has been set up to a nice 11.5ftlb or so the adjuster will be blanked off with a neat little trick suggested by a chap over on STB; meaning the stock will have to come off for muzzle energy to be altered.

    full.jpg


    As might be expected the trigger unit is superb; offering many adjustments including pull length and weight for both stages.

    Perhaps bizarrely the block to which the trigger blade mounts has two longitudinal rails that the post may be attached to; spaced equally about the gun's centre-line on maybe a 10mm pitch. This allows the blade to be offset to one side of the rifle or the other to suit shooter preference.

    The blade assy offers a potentially bewildering array of positional adjustments - the post can be moved fore and aft along either of its two mounting rails as well as canted left to right about them. The blade itself can be moved up / down along the length of the post as well as rotated both about the post's principal axis and the gun's longitudinal axis passing through the centre of the blade.

    Out of the box the setup of the unit itself was fantastic - offering extremely light, smooth, crisp and predictable operation. Unfortunately blade position wasn't ideal - the reach being a bit long for my cocktail-sausage trigger finger despite the blade being right at the rearmost position on its (RHS) rail.

    I could have moved the blade to the LHS mounting rail to reduce the reach, however I'm a firm believer in triggers being on the gun's centre-line and square to deter any off-axis forces pulling the gun off target. As such the trigger post was pivoted to place the blade on the gun's centre-line, and the blade rotated with respect to the post to keep it upright:

    full.jpg


    As always the rifle came in a Negrini-made hard case. While it does the job well enough, IMO it's nowhere near as nice as the Negrini case my other Steyr came in - which is really nice - hats off to Countryway for stocking them!

    I'm not sure if Negrini have just changed the model, it's cost-cutting on Steyr's part or it's because my other one was a private import. Regardless, while not utterly horrible the LG110 case looks and feel cheaper, is less deep and has latches that are non-lockable and ergonomically-facking-horrible - although I've become more tolerant of them after a bit of use...

    full.jpg

    full.jpg


    The rifle had its maiden outing to the club on Wednesday night. Off the rest it acquitted itself well; returning an average 5-shot group size with AA Express at 20yds of 3.4mm c-c, or 3.1mm c-c with one called flier omitted. These groups were shot at the end of a very cold and laborious night at the range, with a 12x scope fitted. I don't doubt that under better conditions group sizes would shrink a little further.

    full.jpg


    I also slung a few standing shots down the range - the rifle proving very straightforward to operate and nicely balanced in the shoulder with a good frontal-bias thanks to the mass of the ally chassis.

    Being tired and frozen standing groups were nothing special, although the experience really highlighted the rifle's excellent trigger, relatively "dead" firing cycle and lighting-fast lock time. Never has it felt so effortless to dispatch at shot to the target and for it to arrive seemingly almost before the trigger had broken.

    I tested the shot development time (trigger release to pellet exit) of a 2014 LG110 FT some years ago (which I believe is very similar to this rifle internally) at IIRC 4.7ms. This is getting on for half what a typical PCP would manage and faster than any other PCP I've tested.

    What wasn't so good was that head / neck position wasn't ideal with the scope so low, although I've since dropped the butt pad further so we'll see if this improves things. In addition there were the other ergonomic issues mentioned earlier (large grip, cold and uncomfortable fore-end), although these weren't an obvious issue in use.

    The gun was noisy and pretty inefficient (using around 60bar over 50 shots so about 1.2 bar of per shot from its 200ish cc cylinder) but this will be sorted when the new port's fitted and the gun set up properly.

    Speaking of which, the rifle feels considerably heavier than it's 2.9kg published mass.. turns out this is because it is. A quick dibble on the scales revealed it's real mass to be around 3.5kg for the bare gun. Not a deal-breaker as it's perfectly manageable and the LSR weight limit is 4.5kg; so with the Panorma fitted I'm around 0.4kg within the limit.


    The plan is to put some more rounds through the gun to establish some more accurate baseline air usage figures before replacing the port and setting up the reg and striker to suit, blanking off the external velocity adjuster and potentially fitting a palm rest in front of the trigger guard to avoid having to grip the cold, awkwardly shaped chassis during standing shots.


    I think that's about it for the nebulous and disjointed observations. In summary while it's not perfect I'm generally pleased with the rifle; it's clearly very technologically accomplished, well-built and shows a lot of potential.

    After a proper setup and a few tweaks I expect it to an extremely capable piece of kit and am suffering a brief and uncharacteristic spell of enthusiasm for what lies ahead :)
     
    Jagdwaffen, talent, NIVEA and 24 others like this.
  3. The Robin

    The Robin Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    Stunning and I'm sure your going to have plenty of fun shooting it ;):D
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  4. Ganton Gunner

    Ganton Gunner Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    very nice :)
     
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  5. mikeyhall1

    mikeyhall1 2018 Forum Nice Guy - Pepe Le Pew

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    I love the look of that! Enjoy!
     
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  6. Shoto1

    Shoto1 Donator

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    Fantastic piece Mike ~ you’ve knocked this one right out of the park...:cool:
     
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  7. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    Cheers guys :)

    I hope my post doesn't come across simply as a "look at me and my new expensive toy" exercise - there should be some more pics and meaty techy stuff added once I get stuck into it ;)
     
  8. PumpnGun

    PumpnGun Donator

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    Thanks Mike, I enjoyed that, no pics for me, what am I doing wrong..

    Ray
     
  9. FerreT985

    FerreT985 Engaging Member

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    I don't usually like that style of rifle, I have simple taste and go for a simple looking rifle but I have to say looking at that made my trousers tighten up :rolleyes:
    Although it's probably right out of my financial range, it's something to put on a wish list

    Superb write up as always
     
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  10. Shoto1

    Shoto1 Donator

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    Yes please :cool:
     
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  11. TrickyDicky

    TrickyDicky Life in the slow lane

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    Wishlist only...but its a lovely rifle.
     
  12. littleJon365

    littleJon365 Democracy unless they disagree

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    Great write up, like reading these in depth descriptions. Helps me a lot. Thanks

    PS can’t see any pics still? Please add some if you get time.
     
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  13. raven hunter

    raven hunter Posting Addict

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    great write up there could do with the photos, done some testing on mine and found that
    JSB 4.51 are better, the 4.52 at 30 yards open up to 30mm , the 4.51 bring it back to about 5 mm on 10 shots.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
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  14. psycho inside

    psycho inside Psycho by name, chilled by nature....

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    I cant see any pics either...! :( Cracking write up though.:up:
     
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  15. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    Thanks guys!

    Apologies about the pics - these should be back up in due course.

    The rifle's now been stripped, probed, prodded, measured, properly set up with the larger port and tested, however I'm holding off on posting a full summary until the photo album facility has been restored and I can get the pics sorted properly..
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2018
  16. raven hunter

    raven hunter Posting Addict

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    look forward to to them.;)
     
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  17. mikeyhall1

    mikeyhall1 2018 Forum Nice Guy - Pepe Le Pew

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    Just had a second read of this, love your write ups Mike!
     
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  18. Mark246

    Mark246 Donator

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    Nice write up once again :up:
     
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  19. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    Cheers chaps - a lot more has been going on with the rifle but life and forum duties have got in the way, plus we've only just got the albums back from the old forum thanks to Andy's continued hard work :)

    Last week the rifle got one final, pre-tweak outing to the club for more benchmarking and a bit more standing work. This visit was more pleasant as I had less crap to test and dug out the glove that had come with my NJR but never actually used. This helped with both the uneven underside of the chassis rail and the fact that it was bloody freezing to the touch!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    The glove seemed to help scores and I was evidently having a decent night as the card were presentable; each saw 10 rounds freestanding at 20yd:

    [​IMG]


    These groups were at the better end of what I usually expect to shoot with an air rifle, although somewhat irritatingly they were all bettered by both my MPR/US and Pro-Target - two guns that cost me in total around half what the Steyr did! I put this down to the fantastic ergonomics of both AA guns; an area in which the Steyr is sadly lacking, despite its unquestionable technical superiority.


    The following night I got stuck into the tuning work on the LG110; a process that inevitably took a lot longer than expected. I'm not going to cover the stripping process in depth as this is covered in the range of videos made available by the ever-pragmatic Steyr. Short of a few pitfalls (one of which caught me out) it's pretty straightforward stuff.

    The first step was to remove the UK-spec / nanny state Turquise 2.2mm ID transfer port; shown below in comparison to the proper, rest-of-world 4mm ID black port:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    The port aperture in the chassis / block - note the exhaust valve stem just visible at the bottom of the hole:

    [​IMG]


    Next the cylinder was removed; this is the shorter of the two standard items and measures around 426mm OAL. The breech end is etched with various bits of information, including working and test pressures, date of manufacture and serial number.

    [​IMG]


    Once the stock has been removed (one large bolt through the grip, one small one into the chassis in front of the trigger guard) the main action block inside the chassis is exposed. This is open-sided to an extent, allowing some of the trigger components to be seen:

    [​IMG]


    Removing two M4 capheads at the rear of the block allows it (in the absence of the transfer port) to be withdrawn rearward from the chassis, along with the cocking lever assembly and loading bolt. Below is the rear of the chassis, viewed from underneath. Very irritatingly there's an area of damage around the cocking lever pivot bolt, evidently caused by a burr on the lever itself.

    [​IMG]


    It's not the end of the world but disappointing and a real shame given the quality and cost of the rifle:

    [​IMG]


    The cocking lever assembly removed from the rifle..

    [​IMG]


    ..and the little b*stard burr responsible for damaging the chassis. I guess this part is stamped; the inside surfaces of the slot that engage the loading bolt dog have been well-polished to ensure smooth operation. It was nice that this area didn't require any attention, however a shame that the finishing process hadn't been sufficiently extended to the outside edges of the part.

    [​IMG]


    Both sides of the lever were worked over with a jeweller's file and fine stone to ensure all burrs were gone and all edges finely radiussed and smooth. Upon reassembly I put a 0.1mm thick M3 shim on top of the cocking lever at its pivot to space it away from the damaged housing. Float in this area is controlled by an O-ring, its compliance suggesting that it would accommodate the thickness of the shim with no issues. This shim was a sh*te to get in the right place during reassembly, but all is good now.

    [​IMG]


    The black anodised ally loading bolt. While visually good the finish on the OD of the bolt isn't perfect, which results in a slight whirring noise during operation as it travels through the chassis. Given that both parts are hard anodised there's very little chance that these will wear in and improve in this area, which is a bit of a sod.

    Note the ball race on the cocking dog on the underside of the bolt; which serves to cut friction with the cocking lever and striker during operation. The retaining collar also rotates freely - as with most of the rest of the gun, someone who knows what they're doing has put a fair bit of thought into this component.

    [​IMG]


    The front underside of the bolt, showing the breech seal and massive 4mm through-bolt porting.

    [​IMG]
     
    bucketboy, WillyWilky, Scott and 3 others like this.
  20. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    On to the main action block / trigger assy - the LHS being by far the most interesting. Working from the front (LHS of image) we have the regulator and valve cover plate, further in we see the trigger assembly in the middle / rear of the unit and finally the external velocity adjustor at the far rear. Unfortunately there were a few marks on the housing which I found disappointing.

    The trigger is a mixed bag. On the one hand it's undeniably very capable; offering a decent range of adjustments while operation is smooth and crisp across a range of light to very light pull weights. However, I was disappointed to find that it's a pseudo two-stage unit (the 1st stage is just free travel and does nothing to disengage the sears) which IMO is a bit poor on a rifle of this cost and standard. There's also no overtravel stop which is a shame.

    In terms of the last two points the unit is bettered by the Air Arms PT / EV / FTP trigger, although there are pros and cons to both units and the Steyr's probably feels better out of the box as the AA units can be a bit rough; responding well to a polish.

    The twin ball races on the trigger blade's pivot pin are a nice touch to ensure smooth, light operation, although I'm no fan of the cheapo spring washers used to retain the sears on their pins / control their side-float. I managed to get the one necessary one off without wrecking anything, but having to lever anything off with a screwdriver is far from ideal IMO as there's always the risk of slipping and damaging something..

    [​IMG]


    The action block from underneath, showing the various trigger adjustment grub screws amongst other things:

    [​IMG]


    The RHS of the block - not a lot to report here!

    [​IMG]


    The top of the block is a bit more interesting. In the mid / centre portion we can see the relieved section in which the cocking lever operates, along with its pivot pin and the striker running down the centre of the action - visible through the loading bolt dog slot that runs longitudinally down the centre line of the block. We can also see the sprung arm of the dry fire mech towards the mid / front of the assembly. Note the tapered exhaust valve throat visible through the transfer port and the general symmetry across the block to allow for both LH and RH cocking lever orientation.

    [​IMG]


    The dry-fire mech in more detail. When the cocking lever is operated the striker is drawn back past this sprung arm, it's larger OD section riding over the angled end of the arm; pushing it out of the way. When the smaller OD section of the striker passes the end of the arm, it returns under spring force into the path of the striker - preventing the striker from contacting the valve should it travel forward. When the cocking lever is returned to the closed position it impinges on the pin in the top of the dry-fire lever, pushing it out of the path of the striker and allowing the gun to fire.

    [​IMG]


    This mechanism serves two purposes - firstly it prevents the rifle firing until the lever is in the fully-closed position, secondly it allows the rifle to be dry-fired if the lever is intentionally left slightly open.

    I'm ambivalent about this mech. When engaged the arm has little contact with the striker and I've read tales of damage to the striker resulting from repeated dry-fire operations. In addition it hinders de-cocking - if the gun is cocked, the trigger pulled with the lever restrained in the rearward position before being gently returned forwards, the striker snags on the arm. When the lever is closed it disengages the arm, causing the striker to ping forward with much reduced travel; which results in the release of a small amount of air as it hits the valve. This is far from great IMO, although the amount lost is much reduced since the gun has been set up properly, on account of the significantly reduced striker spring pre-load.

    Next the striker spring pre-load adjustor was removed - slackening off the grub screw in the LHS of the action block reduces the pressure on the synthetic buffer that separates it from the threads of the adjustor; allowing it to be removed without tools.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    This allows the striker spring to be removed - it's a small, stiff unit at around 6mm OD and 8.5N/mm.

    [​IMG]


    The front sear requires removal to get the striker out - after applying some heavy padding to housing edges around it the nasty spring washer was levered off with little drama. The sear is well-finished in the right places if a little rough elsewhere.

    [​IMG]


    The striker removed; this is yet another example of Steyr's design excellence. The unit weighs around 15g which is very light - the only comparable unit I can think of is that in the Air Arms S200 which is a similar weight. By contrast both Air Arms S400 and BSA Ultra / Scorpion units weigh around three times as much. In addition its stroke is extremely short at around 3.9mm - these two factors combining to give a very fast shot cycle.

    [​IMG]


    I know some like to polish their strikers, although all bearing surfaces have an excellent finish (I'm guessing they're ground) so I didn't bother.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    (Continued on the next page ;) )
     

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