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Question Green parrots, future pest?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by ovy4213, May 11, 2012.

  1. ovy4213

    ovy4213 Pro Poster

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    I've been living in Surrey for around 2 years now for university, and I've had more of these green parrots in my garden then any other bird, and at my permission I have managed to secure down here there's hundreds of them, and only 1 or 2 pigeons or rooks about, its rather annoying as they look so shootable :D
    I then decided to look into there numbers, and apparently there growing in numbers by 30% every year, and have now been found as far north as Scotland!
    With them being non native birds, and could risk the numbers of native birds (sort of like the crayfish situation), would they eventually be put on the pest/general license list?
    They are much more interesting to have in your garden then grey shaggy looking feral's, but would also make some rather 'exotic' hunting in the UK.
     
  2. JD

    JD Donator

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    If they get put on the list of vermin to shoot, Anyone fancy Green parrot pie ?
     
  3. Jackroadkill

    Jackroadkill Donator

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    Do you mean green parakeets? They're on general in England, I think.
     
  4. laurence

    laurence Engaging Member

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    I think they are on the list if its a parakeet !
     
  5. Mart61

    Mart61 Pro Poster

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    I prefer the Norwegian blue.

    :D
     
  6. ovy4213

    ovy4213 Pro Poster

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    Probably parakeets, I couldn't be sure about there exact species, and I don't think there on the general license, but im not sure when it was last updated, so they may be and I just haven't checked.

    As to green parrot pie, its worth a try, probably better than the wife's cooking.
     
  7. milek

    milek Honorary Member

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    Ring necked parkeets
     
  8. Donki Oaty

    Donki Oaty Post Whore

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    WHAT THE LICENCE PERMITS
    2. For the purposes set out in paragraph 1 above, and subject to the terms and conditions, below, this
    licence permits:
    (i) Authorised persons to kill or take any of the wild birds listed at (a) and (b) below, to take, damage
    or destroy their nests or to take or destroy their eggs:
    (a) Crow Corvus corone
    Dove, Collared Streptopelia decaocto
    Gull, Lesser Black-backed Larus fuscus
    Jackdaw Corvus monedula
    Jay Garrulus glandarius
    Magpie Pica pica
    Pigeon, Feral Columba livia
    Rook Corvus frugilegus
    Woodpigeon Columba palumbus
    (b) Goose, Canada Branta canadensis
    Parakeet, Monk Myiopsitta monachus
    Parakeet, Ring-necked Psittacula krameri

    and

    Animals of other species listed on Schedule 9 (this includes the Canada Goose, Branta
    canadensis, the Ring-necked Parakeet, Psittacula krameri and the Monk Parakeet, Myiopsitta
    monachus) must not be released or allowed to escape into the wild. It is preferable that these
    animals are killed in a quick and humane manner as soon as reasonably practicable after
    discovery. These animals may only be released under an individual licence obtained from
    Natural England.
     
  9. ovy4213

    ovy4213 Pro Poster

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    Well then this Saturday night will be interesting.
    I shall inform you all how parakeet pie tastes... if I live.
     
  10. JD

    JD Donator

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    Abit to rare for me, i like my food well done ( In )
     
  11. jolo-bolo

    jolo-bolo Donator

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    Careful you might end up SICK as a parot (somebody has do put it) ok I will get my coat I'm leavening.
     
  12. granuk

    granuk Donator

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    I hope ur not repeating that 'parrot fashion' ...... sorry couldn't resist. ;)
     
  13. hobson

    hobson Engaging Member

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    Their numbers do seem on the increase, there are a lot about near me, i've been told they were accidentally released from Bray Studios years ago and have adapted and thrived.
    Even the landowners of the farm get annoyed with them as they make a lot of noise!

    I wouldn't shoot them personally though as they're not a pest at this stage and i wouldn't have any use for the corpses, i don't agree with shooting animals for target practice or 'because it's there'
     
  14. ovy4213

    ovy4213 Pro Poster

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    I agree, I only shoot what is considered a pest, or what im going to eat. But with them being a non native species they could soon become the new grey squirrel of the bird world. So if reducing there numbers keeps a native specie from becoming endangered or extinct then I'm all for it.
     
  15. milek

    milek Honorary Member

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    I don't think they are a destructive species like the squirrell or mink so not sure how they would impact the native species.
     
  16. ovy4213

    ovy4213 Pro Poster

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    The squirrel its self is not a destructive species (if you don't include pulling apart bird feeders for nuts) they simply out-compete the red squirrel. They are larger, faster, and stronger. So they got the food before the red squirrel, created territories the red squirrel couldn't fight against, and so drove the species away, meaning that there numbers declined rapidly until someone noticed and then acted upon it.
    It could be the same situation as the squirrels with the parakeets, they may not be destructive, but they may eat the same food sources as say a cuckoo, turtle dove, lapwing, yellow wagtail or herring gull (just for a few examples), these birds are already protected as they are endangered, if they get out-compete for food, or nesting grounds, then they could become extremely endangered or even extinct. It's not just endangered species which could be threatened
    [FONT=arial, sans-serif], what if there numbers mean they out compete the common wood pigeon, they would then be placed on the protected species list, its then one less edible game available, and if not controlled a loss of what was once a very common species.
    [/FONT]
     
  17. milek

    milek Honorary Member

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    The squirrell has a disiatrous effect on the songbird population, that is destructive to seperate species, not necessarily it's own. Herring gulls are not protected afaik. I see your other points though and agree that if it became that widespread then yes it would become destructive.
     
  18. ovy4213

    ovy4213 Pro Poster

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    My mistake, your right herring gulls are on the general license. Its the yellow-legged, little and Mediterranean gull's which are protected. :up:
     
  19. mattw975

    mattw975 Keyboard Hero

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    Signal Crayfish, now don't get me started. My local Kennet & Avon canal is infested with them, but try & get an EA Licence to lay traps for these tasty pests :eek: ?? It is nigh on impossible.

    This being a creature that not only decimates our native Crayfish but destroys the banks of our waterways with its burrowing.

    Why don't they make it simpler to catch these blighters legitimately. I was pulling out a bucketful each time I laid a trap until I discovered how complicated it was to get a trapping Licence & what the fines were if you didn't have one.

    Thinking about it a Green Parakeet & Signal Crayfish Paella might just work :D




     
  20. ovy4213

    ovy4213 Pro Poster

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    I love catching crayfish by hand :D
    In the summer I go to a stream near a big manor house, its only 1-2 foot deep at the most, and I just use a old see through plastic bin, place it in the water and you can see the bottom of the stream as if its not flowing, then just pick them up, great fun!
    I love doing it at the beach to but with crabs.
     

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