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Conflicting messages RE zeroing a springer

Discussion in 'Anything Airgun Related' started by GridNorth, May 31, 2015.

  1. GridNorth

    GridNorth Busy Member

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    I seem to be getting mixed messages with regard to zeroing a springer. In my case an AA TX200 with a Nikko Stirling 3-9x 40 AO Mountmaster zeroed, I believe, to 30 yards.

    The advice in the beginners section says clamp in a padded vice. Others say use the "Artillery Hold" and some say don't touch the stock at all. I've watched several YouTube videos but they all seem to show how to do it with a PCP or if it is a springer it's done by someone who has the necessary technical skills and technique down to a fine art. I'm new to this so it's difficult to tell where the problem lies so I need advice that will take my body out of the equation as much as is possible.

    I can't get to a range very easily so I have been experimenting in my back garden at 10 metres. A 1.5 Mil-dot Holdover gets me on target in the vertical plane but the gun seems to be shooting a few millimetres to the left. Do I turn the windage turret left (clockwise) or right to compensate.

    Great Forum by the way. Very helpful and friendly people. it was the same out at Furnace Mill last week. I think I am going to enjoy my new hobby.

    Alan
     
  2. Fizzle007

    Fizzle007 Engaging Member

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    Hi Alan, no such thing as a basic question. Might be worth searching for the thread on zeroing a scope, pretty much all the info in there. 10 yards is fairly close though as it'll usually take around 40 clicks for a 1" adjustment. In your case you'd need to turn the turret to the right (should be marked on it either left or right). Although if it's bang on at 30 I'd suggest checking the scope and mounts are central to the rifle first. When you next get to the range, set out targets at 5 yd increments and put a group of 5 through each, aiming for the bull every time. If they all fall within the vertical plane you've nothing to worry about :) but if they cross from one side to the other then its misaligned, just try swapping the mounts round if this happens. This will also give you your holdover/under points for each of the distances. In regards to holding a springer the 'artillery hold' (google) is generally how you want to hold it, replicating it every time. Springers need to recoil so clamping in a vice is a no no. For zeroing purposes rest your hand on something steady and then cradle the stocks forend in your palm. Hope this helps mate and glad to have you join us :) Atb, Fizzle
     
  3. Jackroadkill

    Jackroadkill Donator

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    As above, don't clamp the rifle down; when you come to shoot it in the field the zero will be miles out. Try the artillery hold out and experiment with different hand positions; I find that holding the rifle as gently as possible works for me.

    As for zeroing, 10m isn't that far but you can use what's called the secondary zero (see picture below; secondary zero is where the pellet first breaks the line of sight, rising as it goes) for shorter ranges which will then translate to a longer range primary zero (where the pellet drops back onto the line of sight at the zeroed range). There's also a computer program and smartphone app called Chairgun which can be helpful as far as understanding and predicting zeroing goes. It's helpful to know the power that your rifle is developing, too - do you know anyone who may be able to chronoscope your rifle and help you find this out?

    If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask away - we were all new to this sport once and the vast majority of our members will be glad to help you out if they can.

    Cheers,

    JR

    [​IMG]

    http://www.hawkeoptics.co.uk/chairgun.html
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  4. Gunfun

    Gunfun Engaging Member

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    Can't comment regarding zeroing a springer as I'm learning, point of impact changes when ever I change shooting position, so I only zero in the sitting position, but do accuracy/pellet test off a bag to eliminate my influence.
    With the scope turrets adjustment direction think - Up, tight anarchist - which means - Up, right = anticlockwise. So to move the pellets point of impact (POI) 'UP' turn the top turret anticlockwise, the same to move the pellets POI to the 'right' except with the righthand side turret. This works for all my scopes but there maybe exceptions so go slowly and check.
     
  5. GridNorth

    GridNorth Busy Member

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    Thanks guys. I can't remember where I saw it, I felt sure it was on this forum in the beginners section where someone suggested clamping in a padded vice.

    With regard to 10 yards being short range for zeroing I wouldn't have thought that it would have made much, if any difference, to the windage adjustment but being a novice I could of course be wrong. I have got Chairgun which I found very useful for helping me understand holdover. I totally understood it for long ranges but couldn't get my head around why I was missing at 10 yards. I was holding under as that seemed the right thing to do before it dawned on me that the scope is a couple of inches above the barrel. DOH :) I've also got the iPhone version of Chairgun but it remains to be seen how useful it will prove. For the learning it looks quite good, it highlights where you should aim given specific wind speeds and distances.

    Alan
     
  6. themadspread

    themadspread Donator

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    another important thing is keeping your front hand in the same spot on the stock if that isnt in the same spot every time that will affect your accuracy as well
     
  7. Fizzle007

    Fizzle007 Engaging Member

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    The only difference really is the amount of clicks to 'walk' the cross hair on to poi. I usually rough zero at 10 yds and then move out to 27 and fine tune. This means you'll be roughly on target anyway and only a few clicks needed to adjust. It should still have a secondary zero of around 10 yds if the scope is aligned centrally. Another thing to consider is 'cant', of either rifle or scope. Hope this helps
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  8. twodoctors

    twodoctors Engaging Member

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    What you have read and what has been posted so far are all correct.

    What you have to be also is realistic. People always talk about shooting pellet on pellet at this distance and that distance. In reality people shoot in small tight groups, or ragged holes. If you are a beginner than don't expect to shoot small ragged holes group yet.

    My advice to you would be to shoot at least 5 pellets per target, and see what you group size is. What you are moving/zeroing is the group, rather than each shot. If you try to adjust for each shot you will end up chasing your own tail. Zero your group, and try to get the group to tighten. When you get there zero the scope again.

    Good luck!

    Adrian
     
  9. Dr B

    Dr B Grizzly Airgunner

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    With a springer you need to control the front end of the stock so you cant just let it rest on a poll or something as it will 'jump'. You can shoot from a bench rest, but cup your front hand onto the stock and front part of the rest to control the flip. Never just leave the front part of the gun unsupported (as you can with a PCP). You also need an 'intermediate' amount of tension on holding the gun into your body, too loose and the gun will jump about. Too tight and things like your heartbeat and breathing will make you wobble all over the place, plus you'll exaggerate all small wobbles, into large ones. Practice will tell you whats best. :up:
     
  10. Dr B

    Dr B Grizzly Airgunner

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    you don't say what calibre of gun (or if you did, I missed it). For a .22 I'd recommend a 28yds zero as being optimal for most set ups. This will actually give you a 1-inch kill zone from 8-31yds and only a 6mm rise through the range.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  11. GridNorth

    GridNorth Busy Member

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    It's a .177

    Alan
     
  12. Dr B

    Dr B Grizzly Airgunner

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    Then somewhere around 33-35yds is likely to be optimal for zeroing but I'm not a .177 chap so dunno......
     
  13. bstaff

    bstaff Well-Known Member

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    This has been very helpful as I'm starting out too and it working through this. The expectation advice is very helpful as it's hard to know what is realistic.
    Thanks
    Brian
     

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