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A First-hand Look Inside The Weihrauch Hw110

Discussion in 'Anything Airgun Related' started by cloverleaf, May 25, 2018.

  1. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    Over the past few months I've sorted some issues on a couple of HW110s belonging to AGF members; which afforded a welcome opportunity to get inside one and see what makes them tick.

    These rifles appear to have proven somewhat problematic and divisive since their introduction; the first example coming to me due to the very common issue of low muzzle energy. I'd like to thank the two owners of these guns (you know who you are!) for trusting me with their gear and affording me the opportunity to learn about something new :)

    I've been given the OK to call everything as I see it and leave the frosting in the cupboard, so you can expect my usual tactful and delicate approach to the subject matter :D

    As usual I've taken one or two pics (of the first gun as it happens, not that this really matters) and since the work was some time ago intend to run through the pics and add any information or thoughts that come to mind. I'm not going to dwell too much on the specific issues with the rifle in question and don't really intend this to be a guide to disassembly / repair, more a tour of the internals for anyone considering buying one or simply interested in their design and construction :)


    Overview & Initial Impressions

    The Weihrauch HW110 was introduced maybe a couple of years ago as a cheaper alternative to the company's popular HW100 PCP.

    The rifle is a regulated 10-shot side-lever PCP with a black rubber coated ambidextrous beech sporter stock. It has an ambidextrous safety, Picatinny rail for scope mounting and is fitted with HW's excellent screw-fit moderator and sling studs as standard.

    While some parts and operating principals are shared the HW110 is a distinctly different rifle to the HW100. This is sometimes a good thing, sometimes not.

    The 110 is around 20% cheaper than the 100 at approx £650 v. around £825. It is also lighter, thanks to its largely polymer construction. It's more accommodating of LH shooters as the sidelever and mag release can be swapped to the opposite side of the action. Mag capacity is nearly a third less at 10 v 14rds, although tbh 10 should be enough for anyone!

    This particular gun came to me with the very common low muzzle energy issue; this example giving IIRC low 10ft/lbs with H&N FTTs.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Construction encompasses a large amount of plastic injection mouldings (most notably the entire breech block), die-cast aluminium and some CNC-machined steel and aluminium components.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The striker and valving layout is similar to that of the HW100; the striker travelling through the centre of the magazine to actuate the exhaust valve:

    [​IMG]

    The cylinder is not detachable, however does share the same inlet valve assy (and cylinder body, etching notwithstanding) as the HW100:

    [​IMG]

    Magazines are different to those of the HW100 and as such are non-interchangeable, although are of the same single-piece, die-cast aluminium construction. Unlike the 100 they are located in their indexed position by a pair of captive sprung ball bearings in the rifle, located just above the exhaust valve.

    [​IMG]


    Initial impressions were that the rifle is certainly lighter than the HW100 and generally well-executed with no immediately obvious issues with quality or finish.

    That said both guns did exhibit significant damage to their forends where the fitment of a bipod had made a real mess of the rubber coated finish; which has a bit of a rep for being easily damaged and is difficult to repair (sorry, no pics of this).


    Disassembly

    On to the interesting stuff! Having not had one of these to bits before I proceeded with extreme caution and took my time. Disassembly proved straightforward and logical (typical Germans) if sometimes requiring a few minutes' head-scratching and poking around to figure out the next step.

    The first operations are to unscrew the mod and remove the stock, courtesy of two socket cap bolts in its underside; leaving the bare action:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The barrel and cylinder are restrained by an injection-moulded plastic support that slides over the flat steel "backbone" that runs beneath the action and serves to provide the stock mounting points:

    [​IMG]

    The barrel support is attached to the barrel via two grub screws; one on either side that each pass through a square, threaded die-cast alloy insert in the plastic support:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This whole setup is a nasty idea for numerous reasons. For one, it prevents the barrel from free-floating; leaving it open to influence from dimensional changes in the stock (resulting from temperature and humidity fluctuations as well as stock bolt torque, potentially) as well as the air cylinder during variation in internal pressure.

    In addition the grub screws impinge directly on the barrel; leaving witness marks when removed. This is very poor IMO..

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Barrel support in isolation:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'm not at all impressed by this barrel support arrangement. IMO a far superior alternative would simply to have retained the lower portion that goes around the cylinder and left the barrel free-floating; sidestepping all the issues the actual setup brings.


    Moving on, the injection-moulded trigger guard assy can be removed by drifting out one pin at its rear and removing on CSK socket bolt at the front:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Removal of the guard exposes another CSK bolt; the removal of which allows the flat steel "backbone" to be withdrawn forwards and out of the plastic breech block:

    [​IMG]


    With the trigger guard removed the trigger assembly can now be seen in more detail.

    [​IMG]

    Removal is simply a case of pulling it up at the front and lifting it out en-bloc. The bulk of the trigger and safety assembly is constructed from alloy castings, while the trigger blade is plastic and only the sears, pins, springs and screws are steel:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Once the trigger assembly is out the mag indexing system can be seen:

    [​IMG]

    This assembly takes the form of a sprung arm that's actuated by an angled face on the underside of the striker. With the striker in the forward position the front section of the arm beneath the mag rests to the RHS of the action..

    [​IMG]

    .. while cocking the striker impinges on the rear of the indexing arm, pushing its front portion to the opposite side of the action; indexing the mag in the process:

    [​IMG]

    The the indexing system just lifts out and typically is mostly constructed from ally castings; with only the pins at either end (that engage the striker and mag) and spring being made from steel:

    [​IMG]


    Removal of the indexing system gives access to the single, propitiatory semi-captive bolt that holds the air cylinder assembly into the plastic breech block.

    [​IMG]

    This is unscrewed while at the same time gently pulling the cylinder assy forward in the block before finally removing it completely.

    [​IMG]


    This leaves the block with just the barrel, striker, cocking lever and mag release assys present:

    [​IMG]

    It appears that the barrel is retained inside the plastic breech block by a non-removable cast alloy insert that's seemingly moulded into the block. I'm not 100% sure how the barrel is held inside this insert; although I suspect it's threaded. I had no need to remove the barrel so didn't try..

    [​IMG]

    Looking up through the breech block the transfer port can be seen, along with its somewhat unorthodox square O-ring. I'm not sure if this it's actually this shape when free, or is just a round one that's been fitted to a square groove. I'm guessing the bolt is to retain the barrel / prevent it being unscrewed; although again can't be sure:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Moving to the rear of the action the rest of the components can now be removed. We begin by unscrewing the propitiatory bolt in the top of the block and sliding off the plastic cover over the upper steel "ladder" insert of the cocking lever assembly:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ...
     
  2. cloverleaf

    cloverleaf Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    ...

    Next the mag release lever assembly can be removed; first by unhooking and removing its spring that sits are the lower rear of the block, then removing the rear cover plate:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Once the rear plate has been removed, the cocking lever pivot pin can be withdrawn from the top of the action. The cocking lever is now opened partially and the mag release lever rotated upward to allow its pressed steel tab to be removed through the rear of the block, then the lever pulled out from the side:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    With some manipulation of the lower "ladder" from the underside of the breech block, the whole cocking lever / mag retaining plunger / probe / lower ladder can be withdrawn from the rear of the block:

    [​IMG]

    True to form a mixture of materials and processes are employed in these parts. The lever is moulded plastic with some steel inserts where it matters, the probe appears to be metal-injection-moulded, while the ladder is pressed steel and the mag retainer cast alloy:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    While it's possible for the lever to be located on either side of the gun, the assembly cannot simply be inverted and judging by the geometry of the lever, I think a new assembly would be required to change the gun's orientation.

    I did try to remove the cocking link from the lever, however attempting to unscrew its pivot bolt simply resulted in the corresponding steel insert within the lever rotating / slipping within the lever. I'm not sure if this is intentional (the serrations around its edge do look somewhat "one way") either way it's a poor show IMO.

    [​IMG]


    The steel striker / shuttle assy can now finally be withdrawn from the rear of the action block. This is effectively a sealed component that contains the striker spring and cannot be adjusted in its as-received state in the gun.

    The inverted striker viewed from the front - note the long "startled Pinocchio nose" that project through the centre of the mag and strikes the rear of the valve. The three holes are there to allow the unit to be disassembled, however at the time I had no tool to achieve this so the striker remained in one piece. Note also the angled cutout on the striker's OD, which is what actuates the mag indexing arm when in the rifle.

    [​IMG]

    The striker viewed from above. The format is similar in principal to the shuttle / spring / striker setup in the HW100, however instead of the shuttle being located behind the striker, it is now located inside it. The rectangular boss on the underside of the loading probe passes through the slot in the striker and acts directly on the shuttle during cocking and loading.

    [​IMG]

    The striker and shuttle are separated by a coil spring (which I believe is the same spec as that in the HW100); the pre-load of which is controlled by a socket head adjustor in the rear of the striker. On this rifle (as on all new ones, I assume) this is blanked off by a plug of some sort, preventing adjustment.

    [​IMG]

    Contrary to some suggestions the striker does run directly inside the plastic breech block (no steel inserts or similar to provide a separate bearing surface). This probably isn't a huge problem from a wear perspective, however I'm not sure how this might influence consistency / output during varying environmental conditions; indeed it appears that HC might have had some issues with finding the correct lubrication for these two dissimilar materials.

    This particular rifle had insufficient spring pre-load so a replacement striker was fitted and set up appropriately. Apparently HC don't want any HW110 parts to be supplied to their owners / end users and are only making them available to their account holders for their own use.. so if you need any bits you'll have to sweet-talk your local RFD.


    That's all for the main action and now we move on to the air cylinder assembly, which has at its rear the machined-aluminium exhaust valve / regulator assembly:

    [​IMG]

    The rear of the valve / reg assy as viewed from underneath. In the rear-most portion we can see the rear face of the exhaust valve in the centre of its threaded, blued-steel retainer. Above this are the two captive ball detentes that locate the mag in position, while to the sides are the holes for the pin that acts as a mag stop during loading - in this case located on the LHS to promote mag insertion from the right.

    [​IMG]

    Below all this is the threaded hole that contains the pre-load adjustor for the regulator, and also doubles up as the anchor point for the bolt that retains the whole assembly within the action block.

    Viewing the assembly from above shows the removable brass transfer port bush in the top of the housing. Note also the cut in the side of the housing, level with the hole for the mag stop pin - I assume this is there to allow access with a punch to drive the pin out as necessary; although if so is a bit tight..

    [​IMG]

    What's less nice is that the spring magazine location ball bearings appear to be captive inside the housing; presumably meaning that they're non-serviceable and if they come out for any reason the whole housing is toast..


    On the RHS of the valve / reg assy we can see three holes containing grub screws:

    [​IMG]

    Referring to these screws in their orientation with respect to the cylinder, we have at the top (left in the image below) the cylinder bleed screw, middle / on circumference of housing (middle in image below) the reg test port, and finally bottom (right in image below) the locking screw for the reg spring stack pre-load / output pressure adjustor:

    [​IMG]

    Note that the cylinder can be de-pressurised on-gun as the screw is accessible through a hole in the side of the action block; although this isn't necessary for the cylinder assy to be removed from the block as it's a self-contained unit.

    [​IMG]

    The bleed valve is certainly a nice touch and makes working on the gun a lot more straightforward; since unlike the HW100 the cylinder can't simply be removed to de-pressurise the action. Screwing the grub screw in lifts a valve from its seat and allows air to vent from the cylinder until empty.


    Once the cylinder is empty it can be further disassembled. The brass transfer port is first unscrewed, then the valve retainer removed from the rear of the assembly; which allows the valve seat / port assy, exhaust valve and spring to be withdrawn:

    [​IMG]

    Below these parts can be seen in isolation. Unfortunately the port insert had evidently been damaged during initial assembly, however was still usable:

    [​IMG]

    Valve assy retainer:

    [​IMG]

    Brass exhaust valve seat / transfer port, which is quite a nice design with a short throat and large porting (which is consequently strangled by the insert further down the line):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The exhaust valve (top) is very similar to that of the HW100 (bottom); but not the same. While the plastic head appears to be identical, the stem is shorter and lacks the larger diameter portion that serves to restrict flow - presumably because this is achieved in the HW110 by the separate port insert.

    [​IMG]


    Removing the valve assemblies from the cylinder was similarly pleasurable to the same job on the HW100. Typically both were a bit tight and needed a bit of heat to get moving, but both came off without damage and the job on the exhaust valve assy was made easier by its flat sides.

    The inlet valve assy appears identical to that of the HW100, and needed no work so wasn't stripped..

    [​IMG]

    While most of the rest of the gun appears to have been made as absolutely cheaply as possible and churned out like shelling peas, the exhaust valve / reg housing is a stark contrast. The whole assembly is pretty complex and appears to have been machined from a single piece of aluminium:

    [​IMG]

    One nice touch is that the exhaust valve plenum has been extended into the cylinder but as much excess material as possible from around it has been removed; maximising cylinder volume. This can be seen in the image below, along with the brass inlet assy for the reg, the brass cylinder bleed valve and its flat-section spring / retainer:

    [​IMG]

    I was initially a little confused as to why the inlet for the reg was both externally threaded and fitted with an O-ring.. later it dawned on me that this is most likely to allow the reg to be set up and tested in isolation; meaning less wasted air and time than would be incurred if the cylinder was assembled (and subsequently had to be bled) during the operation.

    [​IMG]

    The reg assembly dismantled; a simple operation requiring the unscrewing of three parts and withdrawal of all the components from both ends of the assembly:

    [​IMG]

    The reg pressure spring pre-load / output pressure adjustor screw; note the witness mark from its locking grub screw:

    [​IMG]

    The reg piston shares its major diameter with that of the HW100, although is stepped down at its front and has four shallow equi-spaced grooves around the pin that actuates the inlet valve in the reg:

    [​IMG]

    IIRC reg disc springs are the same spec on both the 100 and 110, however there are only 8 of them as opposed to the 16 found in the HW100. I believe their orientations are the same; meaning the spring stack is effectively half the length and double the spring rate as that in the 100 - halving reg piston stroke for a given load.

    The reg inlet valve's ball bearing, spring and seat O-ring appear to be the same spec as those in the HW100, however the seat is held in a separate brass carrier in the HW110:

    [​IMG]

    The threaded reg inlet valve assembly that holds everything in on the input side of the reg:

    [​IMG]


    The cylinder bleed valve spring, which is held in place by the reg inlet valve:

    [​IMG]


    The bleed valve itself; which shares the same seal and insert as the inlet valve at the other end of the cylinder:

    [​IMG]


    With most of its guts removed we can take a look down inside the exhaust valve / reg housing from the rear. Note the screwed-in exhaust valve seat present in the exhaust valve plenum, along with the steel insert in the lower hole for the regulator piston to run inside. I had no reason (or ability) to remove these, so left well alone.

    [​IMG]

    Another thing that really impressed me was that plenum area of the exhaust valve assy appears to have been machined out with an offset tool to increase its internal volume to an absolute maximum - probably not a straightforward or quick process, and a really nice, thoughtful piece of engineering IMO.

    [​IMG]


    I won't go into detail, however the gun needed a reasonable amount of work and after a fair bit of testing the reg output pressure was found to be too low (IIRC around 85bar). Thanks to HW100Tuning.com I acquired a nice reg pressure testing adaptor and hooked up my spanky new (to me) digi pressure gauge to the cylinder; allowing me to test and set reg pressure on the fly:

    [​IMG]


    Due to the need to disassemble the rifle to fit the pressure tester, setting these guns up isn't as quick and easy as the same process on the HW100; however it's a still a lot easier than on some other rifles.

    I also did a quick and dirty input pressure effect test on the reg (was pressed for time and was using an old analogue gauge so results aren't as precise as they might be) however it proved a lot more stable than the reg in the HW100; which IIRC typically varies in output pressure by around 7bar over its 120bar operating pressure range.

    From memory I think the variation of the HW110's reg was around half this; although I'd have to re-test to get some definitive numbers. While similar there are obviously a number of differences between the regs in the two guns and I can't state with certainty where the cause of the improved performance lies... my gut would suggest that they all play a part.

    The greatly increased plenum volume (which must be at least double that of the HW100) will reduce pressure drop during firing (making the system more efficient too) while shorter reg piston stroke, the reduced OD portion on the piston and grooves in its pin should speed up reg operation - which may be the area where the input pressure effect was coming from on the HW100. It'll be interesting to see if any of these changes appear on the HW100 in time.


    After all the reg and striker adjustments the rifle was producing a healthy, consistent muzzle energy - and hopefully this time will remain that way!


    In Use

    I didn't spend an enormous amount of time using either rifle, however both got a fair run over the chrono during setup and testing, while the owner of the second gun insisted that I take it to the range if possible. I obliged as best I could, although all I managed were some shots over the chrono from a rest, a few groups (rendered meaningless by less than ideal conditions) and a few standing shots.

    A few observations I can make, for what they're worth.. The rifle handles and balances quite nicely. Despite it being ambidextrous, I liked the stock's high cheekpiece; less impressive was the (typically for HW) fat pistol grip and long reach to the trigger - which felt like you needed ET-fingers to get a comfortable position on the blade.

    The trigger itself had a nice, clean (apparently) true-two-stage release. It didn't feel as refined as that of the HW100 (which isn't surprising comparing the two units) however I didn't attempt to adjust it, so can't say how much it could be improved. It certainly wasn't bad, anyway.

    Lever operation was light and generally positive but felt a little "sticky". While there are hard points in all the important places (pivot locations) I reckon there was still a bit of plastic-on-plastic contact somewhere in there - making the action feel a bit less slick than it might.

    During use mag operation was flawless, although mag insertion didn't feel particularly positive and I really didn't like the sprung release lever; which was a total ballache to hold in the "down" position while attempting to insert or remove the mag.

    Firing noise was fairly minimal - with very little from the muzzle (as would be expected) and no twang or resonance from the action; just a slightly hollow thud.


    Final Observations and Conclusion

    I found the HW110 to be a rifle of sometimes massive contradictions. In use it acquitted itself reasonably well; proving neither especially good or bad in any respect and on the whole proving fairly middling and uneventful in use.

    It's clear that the gun was designed by some very capable and ingenious individuals. The rifle is competently thought-out with disassembly proving logical and linear - a process that often utilises inter-locking parts that hold each other in place and perform multiple functions, rather than relying on a glut of individual fixings. Nothing appears superfluous and it's a very elegant design.

    While materials used are undoubtedly cheap (which will be covered more a bit later) they're all applied with excellent understanding of their properties and associated manufacturing processes, and nothing in the rifle screams "that's going to last 10 minutes before it snaps in two".

    Thought has clearly been given to efficiently working on the rifle, with nice (if arguably necessary) touches such as the cylinder bleed valve and threaded / sealed reg input valve.

    I'm very impressed by the amount of clean-sheet ideas present in the rifle, as well as the apparent lateral thinking employed in its design. I'm also impressed by the design and quality present in the exhaust valve / reg assy, the attention to detail and care found therein (the enlarged plenum volume for example) and clear improvements in design and performance over the HW100 setup.

    All this said let's not forget that of course the design is not perfect and has its fair share of shortcomings too. The barrel support setup is un-necessarily nasty and the grub screw setup needlessly crude. The fact that the striker runs directly within the plastic breech block isn't great, neither are the captive mag location ball bearings in the exhaust valve housing.

    While the materials used appear to be well-specced for their intended roles, I do have my reservations about some - particularly the plastic breech block; from the perspectives of dimensional stability and longevity, amongst others.

    Let's also not forget that these guns have had their fair share of quality issues - the headliner being many instances of inconsistent and declining muzzle energy (which IMO may well be rooted in the striker and breech design), but also leaks, barrels fitted the wrong way around and general poor-quality of barrels / accuracy issues.

    IMO the enormous elephant in the room (that some are probably more adept at spotting than others) is that this gun has clearly been mercilessly designed to be as absolutely cheap as possible. Mostly competently designed and well-executed, perhaps, but still built right down to a new low watermark in production expense.

    Nearly every component has efficiently been pared down to the lowest possible cost; this being clearly illustrated by the unprecedented amount of parts made from very cheap materials and processes - namely plastic injection moulding and alloy die casting. The external die-cast alloy bits aren't even finished (as they are on the HW100); meaning that after use / contact with sweaty hands affected surfaces oxidise and darken. Also, I suspect the rubber-coated stock probably has some fairly nasty, QC-rejected beech hiding beneath.

    The execution and quality of most parts is good (and the materials no doubt the better end of what they could be) however they are still very cheap in comparison to those more commonly encountered on rifles at this price point.

    While sadly manufacturers are always looking for ways to cut production costs (which usually, if not always result in a corresponding fall in quality / reliability / desirability / longevity), IMO the HW110 sets a new standard in this regard.

    As far as I'm aware the plastic breech block is a first in a PCP (especially one that retails at this price point), while I can't think of any other rifle that uses so much plastic in its construction. Many other guns use a lot of alloy castings, but these rifles are usually significantly cheaper.

    Of course I appreciate that new materials can have their own physical advantages (in this case mass being one), however cost is clearly the core driving factor here and I have my reservations about the use of plastic for such a large and fundamental part as the breech block.

    I'll also freely admit to being a traditionalist and much prefer blued steel, machined, anodised aluminium and oiled Walnut over injection-moulded plastic, die-cast aluminium and rubber-coated beech. Of course all of the former, nicer materials could be had by paying not a whole lot more for an HW100.

    Design issues, (significant) quality problems and apathetic distributor attitude aside I don't intrinsically dislike the HW110; however given how obviously cheap it is to produce I find its retail price absurd, verging on offensive.

    The HW110 is only around 20% cheaper than the HW100 on retail, yet I imagine its cost of production is far, far lower than 20% below that of the 100. It seems that Weihrauch are to an extent trying to have their customer's trousers down by attempting to flog them a much cheaper product at an inflated price.


    In Summary

    While I have some doubts about its longevity and build, IMO the HW110 is a very well-designed rifle that almost nails the specification perfectly of creating a capable and functional rifle while driving production costs to new lows. For what it is it is generally well-executed, however is also very expensive considering the amount of cheap materials and manufacturing processes employed in its production.

    Unfortunately it's also been dogged by repeated issues since its launch; some of which may be design and material related, some possibly just due to poor QC during manufacture.

    While it certainly has flashes of brilliance, the ridiculous price and catalogue of problems put me right off (if I weren't already resigned to never buying another HW following poor experiences with the brand in the past).

    I think the gun could almost be great if the reliability and accuracy issues were cleared up, ergonomic niggles resolved, the barrel support revised, a proper wooden (or even decent synthetic, in-keeping with it's cheap yet space-age theme) stock fitted and the price dropped by a hundred quid or so.

    I'd also love to see a "proper" aluminium breech block as per the HW100, the geometries suited to injection moulding would most likely make production of the block in any other material non-viable.

    All in all IMO the HW110 interesting, novel and envelope-pushing rifle that unfortunately costs far too much and has some significant issues to overcome.

    Sadly for the consumer, the HW110 appears to mark the dawn of a new era of even lower production costs and higher margins, as squeezed manufacturers attempt to maintain their slimming profit margins in the face of falling sales.
     
  3. country_lad

    country_lad Engaging Member

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    Wow, thanks for that. I was dead set on one of these at launch but it seems there are no end of issues. It seems there are few gun makers currently turning out products which don't have in-built issues which is very sad.
     
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  4. Sky

    Sky Top Poster

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    Thanks Mike. As usual, very well written with excellent photographs - a piece to be proud of. :thumb:

    A worthwhile read for anyone contemplating buying one of these. :)

    Now - what are you going to do with all those leftover bits after reassembly? ;)
     
    The Robin, cloverleaf and Blackmax like this.
  5. snipperuk

    snipperuk Donator

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    Your write ups and photos never cease to amaze , thanks for the time and effort :up:
     
  6. Seamaster

    Seamaster Super Moderator Staff Member Mod/Admin

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    What a superb breakdown Mike, absolutely brilliant. Thank you.

    Chris
     
  7. Carlos76

    Carlos76 Pro Poster

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    Great write up enjoyed reading that:thumb:
     
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  8. trumpetier

    trumpetier Very Active

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    Bloody excellent :up:
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  9. Nobbi1977

    Nobbi1977 Donator

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    Thanks for the write up. I like my 110 and have had no issues, yet.

    If I do I guess I know where to send it now :D
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  10. Regal Man

    Regal Man Keyboard Hero

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    What a write up, as has been said already, really really well done . What a breakdown fantastic pics. Really clear. Not to much slating off the HW110 either. Which i like, after all people will buy these. Who are on tight budgets, its taken along time for them to save up
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  11. meerkat1

    meerkat1 Keyboard Hero

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    well what an excellent in depth strip down of the HW110 the time and effort put in to that is second to none and the pics just brilliant but it`s what we`ve become used to ;) i`d like to see you top that one :up:
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  12. mikeyhall1

    mikeyhall1 2018 & 2019 Forum Nice Guy

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    What a fantastic write up of a very current and topical gun Mike.

    I really enjoyed this.
     
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  13. littleJon365

    littleJon365 Democracy unless they disagree

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    Great read, thank you
     
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  14. PumpnGun

    PumpnGun Donator

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    Unbelievably good :claping::claping::claping:

    Ray
     
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  15. PeteJ

    PeteJ Engaging Member

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    Very informative. Thanks for doing this.
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  16. TrickyDicky

    TrickyDicky Life in the slow lane

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    Great write up,:thumb: only skimmed through so far, but it seems vastly overcomplicated in comparison to other guns I have seen.
     
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  17. clive147

    clive147 Donator

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    Great write up Mike :claping:. Really good read, i think as you said manufacturers are starting to build guns down to a budget, whilst at the same time trying to get more monies above production costs out of us poor 'addicts' who are looking for the next big fix. Sadly i think its only going to continue, so i think there's a lot to be said for buying older guns and keeping them going as long as possible.

    atb
    clive
     
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  18. Lon'gun

    Lon'gun An analogue man in a digital world

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    A superb piece of work mike.:cool:
    A veritable masterclass in engineering appraisal:claping::claping:
    Apart from the spares availability, I would have no concerns at all with stripping this rifle using such a thorough guide.
    Thank you:up:
    p.s.
    I own one;)
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  19. mcmj

    mcmj Engaging Member

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    Mike, what a superb article. As one of the owners, I'm very grateful for your work on the rifle. I'm also quite surprised and happy that you didn't completely slate the rifle and found a few things that pleased you. As I paid less than two thirds of the new price for it I'm looking forward to getting it back and seeing what it will do now.
    Best wishes Mark
     
    cloverleaf likes this.
  20. carnivore

    carnivore Very Active

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    Epic! Congrats.
     
    cloverleaf likes this.

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