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Thread: Hatsan model 55s

  1. #1
    Donator nav2009's Avatar
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    Hatsan model 55s

    Purchased the Hatsan 55s this morning so here is my honest review so far.
    Rifle Hatsan (Edgar Brothers) Model 55s break barrel
    Price 110
    Calibre .177
    Weight 7.5 LBS
    Stock Turkish Walnut
    Trigger Quattro 2 stage adjustable
    Other features SAS (shock absorber system), fitted open sights.

    On opening the box.
    You are presented with the rifle in a plastic sleeve and a piece of polystyrene at either end of the gun. The box is not very well packaged at all in the centre and would be prone to being marked IMO during transportation. There is an instruction manual and an allen key to adjust the trigger.
    The stock.
    Was pleasantly surprised by the quality finish on the Turkish walnut stock. Lovely grain and the chequering around the pistol grip and along the side of the forend is quite good. Easily on a par with a Weihrauch or Air Arms 3 times the price.
    hatty1.jpg
    hatty4.jpg

    Metalwork
    The metalwork finish on the 55s leaves a lot to be desired and reflects in its cost unfortunately. Those of you expecting to have metalwork on a par with Weihrauch or such, you can forget that. The finish is really rough along the barrel and cylinder, it has not been polished or buffed to nothing near a nice finish but it wouldn't take long for someone to spend an hour or two rectifying this then of course a re-blue.
    Seems a shame for a company to make a great job of the stock then leave the metalwork in a bit of a mess. The engineering of the metal is fine, not too many sharp edges and it is generally speaking well engineered.
    hatty3.jpg
    Operating
    First of all I want to talk about the trigger. Great trigger indeed is the Quattro, fully adjustable in every way, first stage travel adjustable, first stage stiffness adjustable and second stage pull weight adjustable. After setting the trigger where I liked it which is about 1kg of pull I shot a few Bisley mags through.
    Cocking the rifle is quite easy with the large barrel providing plenty of leverage, but in this particular model you could feel quite a bit of discomfort within the gun when doing so. This was coming from the breech shims and the cocking arm along the cylinder and piston. The safety catch is located at the end of the cylinder and just takes a gentle push of the thumb, it is an auto safety every time you cock the rifle. After firing and fully expecting a large twang from the internals I was not left disappointed to be greeted with one. Stock was off shortly afterwards to reveal a dry mainspring, dry cocking shoe and dry everything basically. Got my grease shryinge out with the rubber tube extention on and molyed inside the piston, all along the spring and guide, the cocking shoe and anywhere else that needed it. Used my 3in1 oil on the breech and got that going smooth and a tad on the trigger. All done without a stripdown by the way.
    All back together now and shooting very similar to a HW80 out of the box. Just a quick short retort but no more spring twang and trying to eat itself on loading. It's producing a very nice 11.2fpe.
    Accuracy.
    I will provide some accuracy figures at a later date due to Hurricane Katrina being outside my front door at the moment.
    Sights.
    Had a play with the open sights before I took them off, easy to use and illuminated orange and green, foresight is not removeable but rear sight is which sits just on top of the breech via allen grub screws.
    Just a word about the SAS shock absorber system, doesn't seem to be any less kick than a Weihrauch HW80 or HW95 or Diana. Not saying it doesn't work - just that it doesn't seem so effective that you would make a note of it.
    Arrester plate.
    There is a plate screwed on top of the cylinder towards the rear to stop scope creep which is screwed into the gap between the scope rails. You then butt one of your mounts up against it but the downside is its too far towards the breech which means you have to have one of your mounts very close to the turrets to mount a scope. This is a bad design feature, it needs to be nearer the rear of the gun nearer to the safety catch.
    Overall opinion.
    There are good points and bad points, some of the bad points need addressing out of the box such as lack of grease and lubes. Poor metalwork will need addressing if you're not prepared to live with it. The stock, trigger and firing cycle are all good points and in my opinion are worth the 110 on their own.
    This gun will make a good hunter and occasional plinker type of affair on the same kind of level as a HW80 but not quite up as high as the 80, probably about 75% as good as an HW80 once it's been greased and lubed up. Accuracy compared to an HW80 has yet to be determined though. Its weight is 7.5Lbs unscoped so is just a tad heavier than the HW95, therefore well usable for hunting.
    hatty2.jpg
    I've mounted a Leapers 4-16x50AO on her and will do some testing with the Bisley mags shortly.
    Last edited by nav2009; 11-01-2017 at 18:25 PM.

  2. #2
    Registered 40+ posts lone wolf's Avatar
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    Nice honest write up mate and i agree with everything you said, mine was bone dry out the box and i think hatsan should address that.

    In terms of value you can not get a better rifle in that pice bracket! It has a great trigger and auto saftey which is nice to use.

    Thats a nice shade of varnish you have on your nails aswell👍

    Sent from my SM-G925F using Tapatalk
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  3. #3
    Donator nav2009's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post
    Nice honest write up mate and i agree with everything you said, mine was bone dry out the box and i think hatsan should address that.

    In terms of value you can not get a better rifle in that pice bracket! It has a great trigger and auto saftey which is nice to use.

    Thats a nice shade of varnish you have on your nails aswell

    Sent from my SM-G925F using Tapatalk
    The good wife does come in handy sometimes you know

  4. #4
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    Yep that's a pretty fair assessment i would say having owned one and i think at 110 it's a very good buy,there's certainly nothing else at about that price to equal it.If you do decide to strip the rifle down at a later date,the barrel pivot bolt is usually done up very tight on these guns and can be a sod to undo so make sure you use the correct width and thickness screwdriver blade other wise you could end up chewing the head of the bolt up.The method i used on mine was to take a parallel sided screwdriver bit of the correct width and thickness insert that into an 8mm socket which was the attached to a 3/8" ratchet handle that i've got in a small socket set.Why they do the bloody thing up so tight i don't know it's not necessary.They must have someone built like Geoff Capes doing them up or they using an air tool.

  5. #5
    Donator nav2009's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Yep that's a pretty fair assessment i would say having owned one and i think at 110 it's a very good buy,there's certainly nothing else at about that price to equal it.If you do decide to strip the rifle down at a later date,the barrel pivot bolt is usually done up very tight on these guns and can be a sod to undo so make sure you use the correct width and thickness screwdriver blade other wise you could end up chewing the head of the bolt up.The method i used on mine was to take a parallel sided screwdriver bit of the correct width and thickness insert that into an 8mm socket which was the attached to a 3/8" ratchet handle that i've got in a small socket set.Why they do the bloody thing up so tight i don't know it's not necessary.They must have someone built like Geoff Capes doing them up or they using an air tool.
    I'll stick a few thousand slugs through her and see how she beds in, I've got a feeling this gun will be a different animal once bedded in (better animal that is).

  6. #6
    Registered 40+ posts Proheatpaul's Avatar
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    I got my hatty second hand from a forum member
    can't remember how much i paid 50 or 60
    and that was with a 3.5/10 x 40mm scope
    illuminated reticule and 30mm body
    so let's say 60 plus nath 92,s work on the stock
    carbined to 300mm
    carbon shroud being done by shauny
    delrin insides , lube and polish
    200 for a tuned , custom one off
    yes she's not an 80 , but she's gonna have a big brother and I will still have change from a hw80 set up
    mine virtually fell to bits ,
    her insides were molyed up to the max
    only struggle was to get the rear block out of the cylinder
    with pins out it still just sat there
    bit of a tap to get it moving and out she popped
    dont get me wrong , I do like quality
    but at the end of the day my rifles work for a living

  7. #7
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    Obviously producing a rifle to sell at this price economies have to be made somewhere even if it's coming from a country like Turkey where wages are a fair bit lower i presume and i'd rather that was done by not spending so much time on the finish to the metal work rather than skimping on the construction or components but it's acceptable none the less especially if it's a working gun.Okay the finish may not be as high as on some other makes,it's obvious there's not as much finishing/polishing done before being blued/blacked but the rifle is robust and well made and if maintained properly should last a lifetime.Where else can you get a rifle with a walnut stock albeit some can be rather plain but they do vary and some can have a decent grain pattern and also a very decent trigger as most guns in that price range the trigger is a let down.With a bit of fettling, a proper lube and finding the right pellet you can have a decent gun and a good work horse.
    Last edited by Patrick; 13-01-2017 at 12:21 PM.

  8. #8
    top lad, and really helpful stevemandm's Avatar
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    Hatsan model 55s

    probably the best value rifle out there. they benefit immensely from a stripdown, deburr and relube before fitting back together. we did all that and fitted a Welsh willy tuning kit, and it's equal to any rifle costing 3 tomes more.
    it's now smooth and quiet to cock, and the recoil is much less (seems controlled and less snappy).
    also, there was a nice bit of walnut under the 'industrial' grade lacquer (which we removed, sanded then oiled).
    all in all, a great rifle, and cheap enough not to be in everyone's collection
    lightsaber ( the nice bright green one ) .air arms s400f superlite karbine .177, hunter green, mattyts modded whisper 130 silencer/uk.neil airstripper, mtc mamba lite 3-12x44 scope, bisley adjustable buttpad, lt1 lubed jsb exact express. dad of mattyts, 2012,13,14,15,16 AGF best junior member.

  9. #9
    Registered 40+ posts oedbachgen's Avatar
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    Didn't think much af the gun, but I liked the oranges and apples, great write up
    I can hit em, I can miss em

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